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Site Setup

The construction phase plan (PDF) must set out the health and safety arrangements and site rules during the period construction work is carried out and suitable site inductions must be provided.

What you need to know

All construction sites require:

  • Site rules
  • Site inductions

The rules should be clear and easily understandable and should be brought to the attention of everyone on site who should be expected to follow them.

Any special requirements such as the need to have translations of the rules available for non-English speaking workers on site should be considered.

Clients may insist on certain health and safety precautions, especially where their business continues at the premises while construction work is in progress.  It may assist everyone if site rules are applied.

Make it clear where your site rules apply and where the client premises rules apply.  Make sure everybody knows and follows the rules relevant to them.

Site rules

Site rules should cover (but not be limited to) topics such as:

  • Personal protective equipment.
  • Use of radios and mobile phones.
  • Smoking.
  • Restricted areas.
  • Hot works.
  • Traffic management systems.
  • Pedestrian routes.
  • Site tidiness.
  • Fire prevention.
  • Permit-to-work systems.
  • Emergency arrangements.

Site induction

Every site worker must be given a suitable site induction.  The induction should be site specific and highlight any particular risks (including those listed in Schedule 3 of the CDM 2015 Regulations) and control measures that those working on the project need to know about.  The following issues should be considered:

  • Senior management commitment to health and safety.
  • Outline of the project.
  • Management of the project.
  • First-aid arrangements.
  • Accident and incident reporting arrangements.
  • Arrangements for briefing workers on an ongoing basis, e.g. toolbox talks.
  • Arrangements for consulting the workforce on health and safety matters.
  • Individual worker’s responsibility for health and safety.

Site inductions should also be provided to those who do not regularly work on the site, but who visit it on an occasional (e.g. architects) or once-only basis (e.g. students).  The inductions should be proportionate to the nature of the visit.  Inductions provided to escorted visitors need not have the detail that unescorted visitors should have.  Escorted visitors only need to be made aware of the main hazards they may be exposed to and the control measures.

Protecting the public

The law says you must conduct your business without putting members of the public at risk. This includes the public and other workers who may be affected by your work.

The project client should provide information about:

  • Boundaries
  • Adjacent land usage
  • Access; and
  • Measures to exclude unauthorised persons.

This will influence the measures contractors take.

Hazards causing risk to the public

  • Falling objects
  • Delivery and other site vehicles
  • Scaffolding and other access equipment
  • Storing and stacking materials
  • Openings and excavations

Other hazards include 

  • Slips, trips and falls within pedestrian areas.
  • Plant, machinery and equipment.
  • Hazardous substances.
  • Electricity and other energy sources.
  • Dust, noise and vibration; and
  • Road works.

Contact Agility R&C

Agility Risk & Compliance Ltd provide tailored solutions to mitigate risk and improve compliance in Health and Safety, HR, Training, and Occupational Health.

If you have an enquiry please call us on 01527 571611 or email us on info@agilityrac.com.

Existing clients call our 24-hour service and you will be directed to your expert consultant.

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